Flexible Karate

+100 Stretching exercises that will improve your high-kicks & kata stances

Practical & Useful Scientific-Evidence

Simple & Unpretentious Language

Easy-to-Read & Dynamic Design

available below! click on a retailor

[Soft & Hard Copy Available Soon]

Digital Copy & Dynamic Stretching Vídeos

TYPES OF STRETCHING

We are going to include knowledge about the 5 Types of Stretching that may be more useful to work in your School/Gym in order to increase Flexibility…

Classic Static Stretching

You reach a certain Range-of-Motion and hold the position for a predetermined period of time.

It can be Passive (with the help of a partner, an object or other body segments like the hands)…

…or Active (where you are able to hold the stretch with the contraction of Agonist Muscles, without external  help).

Note: The Agonist Muscle is the one that contracts so you can stretch the counter muscle.

For example, if you want to make a seated full-split in a Passive way, you open your legs with your own hands or with the help of a partner…

… in an Active way, you open your legs with the action of the Abductor Muscles, that contract and pull the legs to the sides.

Whenever you have to contract some muscles to hold the Range-of-Motion (without using any external help) you are performing an Active Static Stretch.

That’s why the same Classic Static exercise can be used to develop Passive or Active Flexibility. The choice between both strategies always depends on your students/athletes’ level of ROM!

Dynamic Stretching

Involves the execution of movement throughout the Range-of-Motion of each athlete.

If you want to increase the levels of Flexibility, this is not the best method, in adults; but it’s effective in children!

Dynamic Stretching is great to Warm-up and to potentiate muscle performance in terms of power, strength, and speed.

It’s also an effective method to maintain the actual levels of Flexibility.

Some authors and trainers include Ballistic Stretching inside Dynamic Stretching but we separate both methods like this:

  • Dynamic Stretching – exercises with slow, soft, and progressive movement
  • Ballistic Stretching – exercises with high-speed execution

Dynamic Stretching – Performer: Beatriz Genízio

Ballistic Stretching

Involves the execution of fast movements throughout the Range-of-Motion of each student/athlete – sometimes it even overpasses normal ROM.

It also includes bouncing movements… Bouncing in and out of a stretched position.

Ballistic Training – Karateka: Beatriz Genízio

Ballistic Training, Bouncing Movements – Performer: Beatriz Genízio

PNF-Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation

It’s a combination of Static Stretching and isometric contractions in a cyclical pattern.

It consists of 3 common techniques:

Hold-Relax

  • Step 1 – Put a muscle in a stretched position (also called Passive Stretch) and hold it for a few seconds (with the help of a partner or your hands, for example)
  • Step 2 – Contract the muscle without moving (also called isometric contraction), such as pushing gently against the external resistance without actually moving.
  • Step 3 – Relax the contraction, and then stretch again while exhaling (with the help of the external force). This second stretch should be deeper than the first.

Contract-Relax

  • It’s almost identical to Hold-Relax, except that instead of contracting the muscle without moving, the muscle is contracted while moving (pushing the external force). For example, in a Hamstring stretch, the partner/instructor provides the external resistance as a dancer/athlete contracts the muscle and pushes the leg down to the floor.

Hold-Relax-Contract

  • Step 1 – Put a muscle in a stretched position (also called Passive Stretch) and hold it for a few seconds (with the help of a partner or your hands, for example)
  • Step 2 – Contract the muscle without moving (also called isometric contraction), such as pushing gently against the external resistance without actually moving.
  • Step 3 – Relax the contraction, and then stretch again while exhaling. In this method, additionally, with the help of the external force, you also contract your Agonist Muscles and actively assist the stretch. For example, in a Hamstring stretch, this could mean engaging the muscles to pull the leg further, as the trainer pushes in the same direction.

Note: In the Free Update, we will add many videos with PNF and Self-PNF exercises.

PNF is an effective method to increase Flexibility but traditionally requires the help of a partner or the Instructor.

But some researchers have studied the effectiveness of Self-Administred PNF and results are positive. That means your students/athletes can use PNF as an individual Stretching method.

available below! click on a retailor

[Soft & Hard Copy Available Soon]

Digital Copy & Dynamic Stretching Vídeos

Any question?

Comment here

© 2018 Science Bridges

sb-logo-og-01